Go with your gut

 

Why is it that 'go with your gut' is often the final piece of advice we give to clients, before they make an offer?


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We have recently completed on a £12m home and have another under offer at £10m, and I am reminded that even at the top end of the market, intuition has the final say. Gut instinct overrules rational analysis.

Having worked in London's prime residential property market for 15 years, guiding Homes One clients to best in class properties for the last 10 of those, having a sense for the reasons people buy is fascinating to me.

In such a high stakes game as London property, can intuition really be so important, as clients dig deep to go for seven or eight figures?

Often it is pivotal.

But why?

Many business trainings inform delegates of the three brains in our body – head, heart... And gut.

The Japanese call this area the ‘Hara’, or ‘Lower-Dantian’.

One of the central principles of the martial art of Aikido is that if you do not hold your attention on this place, you will be overwhelmed by your opponent. It is of critical importance to ‘move from the Hara’.

Modern science reinforces these ancient understandings. It is said by neuroscientists that there is actually more neurology and intelligence in the gut than in our head.

In Chinese Medicine the gut is known as the ‘Gate of Origin’ or the ‘Sea of Qui’ (pronounced Chi) for exactly those reasons.

When we loosen our linear, logical thinking and trust our intuition, we awaken our full capacity and potential. We are free to enjoy life, amidst the responsibilities and urgency of business and family.

It's because my clients are used to outperforming markets that they know intuition so well. They are not solely process-driven, rational thinkers. Yet neither do they take unnecessary risks. They are used to the unexpected and they know that analysis and data only get them so far. Often they have successfully navigated (or avoided) major crisis, and as such they have established an uncommon trust in their sixth sense. 

Yet we all need to be reminded of this at times, and as such it is a key part of the guidance we offer clients.

After the hard work and research needed to unearth the right opportunity and ascertain the right price, we are never scared of reminding our clients to that the deciding factor is often to trust your gut. 

After asking them: 

‘What do you think?’ 

We always ask: 

‘How does it feel?’ 

It’s what got us to where we are today.

 
Karim Bazzi